How to calculate the square footage of a room

Calculator Use

Use this calculator to find the square footage, square inches, square yardage, square meters or acres for a building, home, garden or construction project. Calculate square footage, inches, yardage, meters and acres for landscape, flooring, carpet, or tiling projects to estimate area and the amount of material you will need. Also calculate the cost of materials when you enter the price per square foot, price per square inch, price per square yard or price per square meter.

Price is entered in the fields, for example, as $ price: 3.00 per: 1 square unit: foot (ft²) meaning $3.00 per 1 square foot or $ price: 25.00 per: 1000 square unit: foot (ft²) meaning $25.00 per 1000 square feet etc ….

If you want to calculate volume of bulk materials such as mulch or gravel you should use our calculator for cubic yards and cubic meters.

Enter measurements in US units or metric units. Calculate area from your measurements in inches (in), feet (ft), yards (yd), millimeters (mm), centimeters (cm), or meters (m). You can also enter decimal values. For example, if you have one measurement that is 7’3" you can enter that as 7.25 feet (3"/12" = 0.25 ft). If you have a measurement of 245 cm you can also enter that as 2.45 m.

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How to measure square footage of a room

It is very easy to compute square footage of a room of standard widths/lengths. All you need to do is multiply the length of the room by the width of the room. From example, if a room is 10 feet wide and 15 feet long, you would multiply 10 x 15. This would mean you would require 150 square feet of flooring to renovate the room.

What is Usable Square Footage?

If you’re involved in commercial real estate in an

If you’re involved in commercial real estate in any way, you may have heard the term “usable square footage”. This term describes the total amount of square footage that a tenant is able to use, which excludes areas like hallways, stairwells, and lobbies. When it comes to residential real estate, the usable square footage in your home refers to the amount of space that would count as your personal space.

Common areas like kitchens, living rooms, hallways, and storage closets wouldn’t count as usable square footage. With this information in hand, you should be able to calculate the actual square footage of your home as well as the usable square footage of your home.

Being able to calculate the square footage of you home can be very helpful when you’re attempting to sell your property or would like to complete a renovation. If you’re getting ready to renovate your entire kitchen, knowing the square footage of the floor will allow you to purchase the right amount of materials. Keep in mind that most flooring materials are priced by square feet.

Let’s say that hardwood flooring has a price of $10 per square foot. If your kitchen has a floor space of 175 square feet, the flooring would likely cost around $1,750. In the event that you work as an architect or structural engineer, knowing how to calculate the square footage of a space can be invaluable for your work.

Jason Somers, President & Founder of Crest Real Estate With over 15 years of professional experience in the Los Angeles luxury real estate market, Jason Somers has the background, judgement and track record to provide an unparalleled level of real estate services. His widespread knowledge helps clients identify and acquire income producing properties and value-ad development opportunities. Learn more about Jason Somers or contact us.

How many square feet is a 20×20 room?

The square footage of a room measuring 20 feet wide by 20 feet long is 400 square feet. To calculate this you simply multiply the width by the height. 20ft × 20ft = 400 sq ft.

What to leave out

A good rule of thumb to ensure you’re taking proper measurements is to exclude space you can’t walk on or live in. These types of spaces do not count as “gross living area.”

“Someone might think, ‘If I get the measurement of my first floor and I have a two-story house, I just multiply that by two,’” Day says. However, if that first floor includes a two-story foyer, you can’t count the non-usable space.

Basements and garages, even if they are finished, don’t generally count toward total square footage. Basements are typically excluded because they are built below grade, meaning below ground level. If your state does allow basements to be included in the total square footage of a home, though, you’ll likely need an ingress and egress, or a safe way to enter and exit the basement to the outside.

Finished attic spaces — with some regulations, including ceiling heights — can count toward the total square footage of your home. If you are planning to sell your home, work with a real estate agent to craft a listing that accurately reflects your property.

How to measure for bullnose?

Measure the length of any outside edge where your tile edge would be exposed or you want framed out.  Bullnose (also called trim pieces and decorative tiles) are typically sold by the piece. To figure the quantity you have to establish the length of the trim piece (i.e. 6″ bullnose, 8″ decorative liner), then the rule is:  Your total linear length divided by the length of each piece equals your quantity needed.  

Calculate the square footage of an oddly-shaped room

Rooms with complex shapes can be difficult to figure out. Some people try to figure out the square footage with a single calculation. This is where problems begin! The easiest way to calculate the square footage of an odd-shaped room is to divide it into even shapes, like squares or rectangles. You should then measure each of these shapes and multiply their lengths by their widths. Each of these multiplications can then be added together to give you the overall square footage of your room.

Consider waste

When installing a new floor, you should always consider the waste factor. When ordering flooring materials, you should add around 10% to your total square footage. This is because some materials will become damaged due to errors, accidents and additional cuts. There’s nothing more frustrating than running out of materials during installation. Avoid this by adding an additional 10% for waste onto your flooring order.

Consider asking a professional

If you are not confident with your calculation skills, you may want to hire an expert. A construction expert skilled in floor installations should be able to help work out square footage easily. It can also be worthwhile hiring a flooring installation worker if you have an odd-shaped room. If you are uncertain of how to correctly calculate, you may want to contact us. We can help you understand how to work out square footage of a house.

How to Find Square Footage: Measuring the Room

After countless hours of going back and forth between the Ambient® samples you ordered (and maybe sending out too many “which one do you like better?” texts to friends and family), you’ve FINALLY made your decision. You’ve found the perfect floor and – before you decide to change your mind for the tenth time – there’s only one thing left to do: determine how much square footage you need to order. To figure that out, it may or may not involve your least favorite school subject. Want to take any guesses? That’s right, it’s math! I can tell you can hardly contain your excitement, so let’s jump right into figuring out how much flooring you’ll need to purchase.

How to find the square footage of a rectangle

  1. Measure the width and length of the area in feet.
  2. Multiply your length and width together to get your area.

Note: If your measurements aren't in feet, convert them to feet first using our length converter.

Once you've carried out your calculation, you will have your square feet (ft2) figure. To calculate your cost of materials, simply multiply this figure by your price per square foot.

Different Units of Measurement

Using square feet is the most common unit of measurement in American real estate. But it’s not your only option. For small projects, you might want to work in square inches. For big projects, like landscaping, square yards might make more sense. And in international real estate markets, square meters are the standard for home measurements. 

Whatever your unit of measurement, the formula is the same. Multiply the length times the width to calculate the area of square and rectangular surfaces. Just make sure you’re using the same unit of measurement for your length and width. If you’re looking for square feet, measure both distances in feet; if you’re looking for square meters, measure both distances in meters.

How to calculate square footage? 

It’s easy.  Follow these steps.

Measure the length in feet, Measure the width in feet. Multiply the length figure by the width figure.  This will be your total square footage for that portion of your project.  Continue to repeat this for all parts of the space that will get the same tile.   Add these together for your total square footage.

Measuring in inches works as well.  Do the math the same way, then divide by 144 to get your total in square feet. When calculating square footage account for the entire space (i.e. under vanity/cabinets).

Why Tenants, Homeowners, and Landlords Need to Know Square Footage

There are several reasons why tenants, homeowners, and landlords should all know how to calculate square feet:

  • Knowing the square footage of a room can help you confirm if your furniture will fit.
  • Knowing the square footage of a specific surface can help you estimate renovation costs. If you’re replacing a kitchen countertop, for example, you need to calculate the square footage of the countertop so you can get accurate quotes for the cost of the job.
  • When you know how to calculate square feet, you can make sure you order the right amount of supplies and materials. If, for example, you plan to paint a wall that’s 12 feet long by 10 feet tall, you need to find the total square footage so you know how much paint to buy.
  • Perhaps most importantly, knowing the square footage of homes and apartments helps you compare prices to find the best value. Let’s say you’re deciding between two similar apartments: Apartment A is $1,500 per month and Apartment B is $1,800 per month. Which is the better deal? Well, it depends on the square footage. If Apartment A is 500 square feet and Apartment B is 1,000 square feet, you’re getting more space for your money with Apartment B. 

Square Footage Formulas and Images for Different Areas

Using measurements in feet: Area (ft) = Side Length x Side Length

Using measurements in feet: Area (ft) = Length x Width

Using measurements in feet: Inner Area (ft) = Length x Width Total Area (ft) = (Length + (2 x Border Width)) x (Width + (2 x Border Width)) Area (ft) = Total Area – Inner Area

Using measurements in feet: Area (ft) = Pi x (Diameter/2)^2 Pi = 3.14

Calculate square footage for a circle border area Using measurements in feet: Outer Diameter = Inner Diameter + (2 x Border Width) Outer Area (ft2) = Pi x (Outer Diameter/2)^2 Inner Area (ft2) = Pi x (Inner Diameter/2)^2 Area (ft2) = Outer Area – Inner Area Pi = 3.14 Obviously, the Circle Border and Annulus are the same, just measured differently.

Calculate square footage for a annulus area Using measurements in feet: Outer Area (ft2) = Pi x (Outer Diameter/2)^2 Inner Area (ft2) = Pi x (Inner Diameter/2)^2 Area (ft2) = Outer Area – Inner Area Pi = 3.14 Obviously, the Circle Border and Annulus are the same, just measured differently.

Using measurements in feet: Area (ft) = (1/4) x square root[ (a+b+c) x (b+c-a) x (c+a-b) x (a+b-c) ]

Using measurements in feet: Area (ft) = ((a + b) / 2 )h

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